Wednesday, April 18, 2012

5 dgital tools to boost your brand in 2012

Cheap Sally's 2012 Digital Tools

Thursday, April 5, 2012

a history of social commerce

Here’s a brief history of Social Commerce:  now to figure out where its going!

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
Social Commerce Psychology
juicyagency:

Social Commerce Psychology [INFOGRAPHIC]

Social Commerce Psychology

juicyagency:

Social Commerce Psychology [INFOGRAPHIC]

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Does Social Commerce work? Fact or fiction

Social media marketing solution provider ArgyleSocial recently created an infographic that asks an important question, is social commerce success fact or fiction?

(Taken from Social Commerce Today http://socialcommercetoday.com/does-social-commerce-work-fact-or-fiction-infographic/)

The company interviewed 566 online retailers ranging from big brands to small, niche sites and came to the following conclusions:

  • Consumers don’t yet trust social media – 55% of consumers are “uncomfortable” providing credit card information on social sites.
  • Retailers need strategies for social media – social media should complement existing storefronts rather than just replacing them.
  • Retailers haven’t learned to act like “people” – retailers overwhelmingly act like “stores” instead of building a personality around their brands.

To this last point, in a related blog post Argyle’s director of marketing and operations Tristan Handy said that Facebook is forcing brands to act more like people. “The biggest change for marketers is this: you are no longer allowed to use Facebook as Yet Another Ad Network,” he said.

Handy cited three reasons the switch to Timelines for brand pages mandates such change:

  • Marketers used to set a default tab, and then plaster a full-page promotion across it. This isn’t social media marketing–this is banner advertising. Facebook says no.
  • Marketers used to “ask for the Like” everywhere they possibly could. Real people don’t do this, and it has now been disallowed in primary content areas.
  • Marketers used to only interact in public, in ways that encourage virality. Real people also exchange private messages, pure 1:1 communications. Facebook now enables this.

He encourages marketers to develop a personality around their brands and suggests that they ask this question, “If your brand were a person, who would it be?”

There has been talk of Facebook brand pages going the way of the albatross thanks to a focus away from brand-to-fan communications in favor of friend-to-friend sharing via the newsfeed. However, if brands can act more like people – something the introduction of Timelines seems to support – then perhaps there is hope for them yet.

Omni-channel retailing…how people use their mobile phone to shop in store.
Nice infographic with lots of data about tablets and mobile shopping.

Omni-channel retailing…how people use their mobile phone to shop in store.


Nice infographic with lots of data about tablets and mobile shopping.

So let’s take a look at this new infographic from ArgyleSocial, which perhaps brings a more realistic view of the state of social commerce.
The main points here are:
Audience size doesn’t always translate into more revenue. Smaller brands tend to have bigger audiences and I think this is due to better communication strategies
Only 17% of the brands included in the study feature products and 4% have integrate Facebook checkout features
Brands are not asking for a sale. 49% never include calls to action in messages on Twitter. 44% on Facebook
Only 29% include special offers/deals on posts (Even though we know most people “Like” brands to get access to them)
65% of the brands only share their own content
91% do not use premium social media management tools and rely mostly on free solutions
One thing to note…Facebook is still very demand generation/above the line marketing.  you go to Facebook to browse and discover.  People still go to search when they want to accomplish something.. So at the moment, Social Commerce is still like buying a cupcake on the high street while wondering around a quaint tourist village.  People will buy - but aren’t really there for that purpose yet.  LIke that analogy?!  :)

So let’s take a look at this new infographic from ArgyleSocial, which perhaps brings a more realistic view of the state of social commerce.

The main points here are:

  • Audience size doesn’t always translate into more revenue. Smaller brands tend to have bigger audiences and I think this is due to better communication strategies
  • Only 17% of the brands included in the study feature products and 4% have integrate Facebook checkout features
  • Brands are not asking for a sale. 49% never include calls to action in messages on Twitter. 44% on Facebook
  • Only 29% include special offers/deals on posts (Even though we know most people “Like” brands to get access to them)
  • 65% of the brands only share their own content
  • 91% do not use premium social media management tools and rely mostly on free solutions
One thing to note…Facebook is still very demand generation/above the line marketing.  you go to Facebook to browse and discover.  People still go to search when they want to accomplish something.. So at the moment, Social Commerce is still like buying a cupcake on the high street while wondering around a quaint tourist village.  People will buy - but aren’t really there for that purpose yet.  LIke that analogy?!  :)
Thursday, February 23, 2012
The infographic to end all infographics! $30B Market in 5 years.  Social Commerce is on the rise - despite recent warnings otherwise (like Bloomberg’s f-commerce article.)  
Social Commerce + Mobility (check #2) + Location-aware experiences (SoLoMo) is worth the investment.  But this is big-brand investment right now…as ROI will be slow to come.  But more expensive as time goes on.

The infographic to end all infographics! $30B Market in 5 years.  Social Commerce is on the rise - despite recent warnings otherwise (like Bloomberg’s f-commerce article.)  

Social Commerce + Mobility (check #2) + Location-aware experiences (SoLoMo) is worth the investment.  But this is big-brand investment right now…as ROI will be slow to come.  But more expensive as time goes on.